Myths about Meditation

Meditation is a very popular way to reduce stress and anxiety for mental health situations, however sometimes people don’t understand it’s not for everyone, there are some downsides to it.

It’s been proven that it can have positive effects on the mind and body, but it’s also thought to be a temporary effect so you need to keep it up to gain full the effect.

You don’t have to consign yourself to the spiritual aspect of the practice either, but it has shown that people who practice some form of meditation become more spiritual over time.

Here is a great article that goes deeper into the myths of meditation.

Photo credit: Balint Földesi

Mental Health Illness – Failed by the NHS

With the issue of mental health one of the most important things is knowing you have a problem, then the issue is getting support.

For young people mental health makes them feel like a burden to the system, which is the worst way you can feel when in a frail state of mind.

Here is a great video documentary that outlines the struggling for young people in the UK

Mental Health Nursing Jobs in the UK

When you’re looking for a mental health nursing job the My Nursing Career site seems to have a good reputation for getting you the right position. With links to some major recruiters it’s like a one stop shop or money supermarket of nursing jobs and it seems simple to sign up.

If you have left any of the nursing professions or want a change then they want to help you get a better deal, less stress, more resources for patients, and on a timetable that suits you.

Here is a just a few of the positions they deal with

  • Mental Health Nursing Jobs
  • Auxiliary Nurse Jobs
  • RMN Jobs
  • RGN Jobs
  • Staff Nurse
  • Paediatric Nurse
  • Psychiatric Nurse
  • Neonatal Nurse

They also cover various positions like

  • Part-time Nurse Jobs
  • Full-time Nurse Jobs
  • Temporary Nursing Jobs
  • Contract Nursing Jobs

How do you keep fit mentally and emotionally?

We all know the basics of looking after our physical health (even if we don’t do it that well). It’s part of our everyday lives – people think about their diets, they go to the gym, they join a sports team – it’s about getting into good habits.

The key to good mental health is no different. Its about introducing new habits into our lives. This sounds simple, but it’s certainly not easy. Changing our habits can be hard work, we often need support, but the results can be life-changing!

Trouble is, most people don’t know how to look after their mental health.  Yet research tells us that probably 2 out of 3 adults in the UK would benefit from improving their mental wellbeing. Sure, we might jog along OK but we experience anxiety and stress on a fairly regular basis. We might lack motivation, feel stuck in a rut, worry about the future.

And 1 in 4 of us can expect to experience mental ill-health such as depression or anxiety, which can have a devastating effect on our work, our families, and our lives. A recent World Health Organisation report estimated that up to 90% of GPs time is spent dealing with mental and physical ailments which are stress-related.

How do we react? Our most likely responses are to ‘do nothing, just live with it’, ‘eat comfort or junk food’, or ‘spend time alone’ – all strategies which are pretty certain to make things worse.

 Good mental health is, if not more important, than good physical health. For everyone there will be times when more attention is needed than others. 

With Life in Mind

Does this sound like you?

  • You long for some time and space to yourself – you feel you spend your life responding to the demands and needs of others
  • Your emotions feel completely out of control at times – you may react angrily to relatively small incidents, or become very upset at others
  • You’ve had to take some time off work because you’ve been overcome with stress or anxiety
  • Whenever you try and move on in your life, things seem to go wrong and it feels like a never-ending uphill struggle

A recent survey by the Mental Health Foundation showed that most people faced with stress, anxiety or depression respond by either ‘doing nothing, just putting up with it’, ‘eating comfort or junk food’, or ‘spending more time alone’.

You may feel, that you can’t afford to invest in yourself, that somehow you don’t deserve it. You may ask yourself, who am I to spend money on improving my emotional health and mental wellbeing?

On the other hand, if you’re reading this you may have realised that if you want to feel better, want to make changes in your life, want to feel more in charge of your mental wellbeing, you have no choice but to invest in yourself.

The next problem is, how do you decide what’s right for you?

There are lots of options out there, some excellent, some charlatan, some downright dangerous. Do you try counselling, meditation, adult education, yoga, rambling, volunteering, holistic therapies?

What if you could find a way of assessing your own mental wellbeing to identify your strengths and areas you need to work on? What if you could find low cost, practical options to help – and also understand what kind of specialist help would really benefit you, rather than acting out of desperation?