Category Archives: Nursing

Further Reading: Comics About Mental Health

Graphic novels, strips and comics about mental health are an accessible and unique way of understanding the conditions they present. We’ve found some of the best to read online.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Tyler Page‘s “medicated memoir” is a personal account of a lifetime of medication for what many still perceive as a childhood disorder. An extensive look into ADHD and also the medication industry, a Kickstarter for a physical release has recently been successfully funded.

Raised on Ritalin

Anorexia / Body Dysmorphia

Australian artist Khale McHurst‘s 206-part therapeutic exercise and chronicle of her realisation that, despite telling herself otherwise, she did indeed have an eating disorder is a journey which encompasses denial, depression, and acceptance in vivid, honest detail. Each strip is annotated with notes made after publication which gives further detail and insight of her continuing recovery.

I Do Not Have an Eating Disorder

Depression

“But trying to use willpower to overcome the apathetic sort of sadness that accompanies depression is like a person with no arms trying to punch themselves until their hands grow back”

US-based Allie Brosh’s Hyperbole and a Half blog entries about her sudden depression is rightly lauded for being a highly accomplished portrait of the condition in all its illogical and miserable non-glory.

Adventures in Depression

Depression Part Two

Schizophrenia

British Artist Darryl Cunningham took his experiences of his time working in a mental health institute and has compiled them into his 2011 graphic novel Psychiatric Tales: Eleven Graphic Stories About Mental Illness. You can read a selection of the chapters on his website, including this excellent chapter on the often-misunderstood Schizophrenia.

Psychiatric Tales: Schizophrenia

Anxiety

Gemma Correll’s blog is a continuing story of silliness, pugs and social anxiety. Her recent work involves taking suggestions from readers for illustrations for Mental Health America and their #MentalIllnessFeelsLike campaign.

Gemma Correll

Honourable Mention: Better, Drawn

The blog Better, Drawn hasn’t been updated in a while, but it’s still a valuable resource. Hosting short comic panels about a variety of mental health conditions, these bite-size presentations make a big impression.

Better, Drawn

Mythbusting: 50 Inaccurate Psychological Terms

Open-access publisher Frontiers in Psychology has recently published a list of 50 inaccurate psychological terms.

This extensive list of “misleading, misused, ambiguous, and logically confused words and phrases.” is full of commonly used, but not commonly understood terms.

Aimed at students and teachers in order to curb “terminological misinformation and confusion,” the list also provides corrective terms and information.

Breaking down misconceptions into sections such as “Frequently Misused Terms”, Inaccurate or Misleading Terms”, and “Oxymorons”, the list tackles commonly used terms such as “Autism epidemic”, “Bystander Apathy”, and “Closure.”

It’s a comprehensive and highly technical list, but utterly fascinating.

Fifty psychological and psychiatric terms to avoid [via Frontiers in Psychology]

Floral Art Installation in Mental Health Centre

In 2003, American artist Anna Schuleit made a floral art installation in a mental health centre to honour patients, staff, and the building itself upon its closure. Entitled BLOOM, the installation was made up of 28,000 flowers and 5,600 square feet of sod, which were placed throughout four floors of the Massachusetts Mental Health Center (MMHC). Schuleit also used the building’s public announcement system to quietly pipe the sounds of the MMHC recorded during its final weeks.

In an interview with Colossal, Schuleit explained her process and how the installation was inspired by the fact that whilst flowers are common for hospital patients, their absence is noticeable in mental health institutions: “As a visiting artist I had observed an astonishing absence of flowers in psychiatric settings. Here, patients receive few, if any, flowers during their stay. Bloom was created to address this absence, in the spirit of offering and transition.”

The installation ran for four days before the building closed. All the flowers and sod used in the installation were “donated to psychiatric hospitals, general hospitals, halfway houses and homeless shelters throughout New England.”

The flowers may be gone, but the project is preserved online though the official project website, and interviews with the artist.

BLOOM Project [via Bloom]

Anna Schuleit Interview [via Colossal]

Mental Health Nursing – 5 Personal Experiences

Mental Health Care NurseAs many of you in the profession will already know (or at least be beginning to suspect) the only people who really understand what it is like to be a mental health nurse are other mental health nurses.

With this in mind, we thought who better to turn to for advice and personal life experience than a selection of experienced nursing professionals working in the mental health world.

Here we have gathered together 5 of the most compelling personal accounts from this unique and challenging profession which should help you overcome your own challenges, get another person’s perspective on the job, or at least dispel that feeling that no one else understands the challenges you are going through.

Paula’s account on Change.org is unique in that she has experienced mental health nursing from both sides – as a nurse and as a patient – her account here is both compelling and inspirational:

http://www.time-to-change.org.uk/blog/my-experience-mental-health-nurse-and-patient

This regular blog from a mental health nursing student describing her placement is extremely informative, highlighting both the stresses and the rewards of this challenging course, and what it is like to face this type of workplace for the first time as a young student:

http://i-am-a-mental-nurse.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/new-placement-sadness-worries-hard-work.html

The following article has become very popular on BlogSpot because it simply sums up a collection of extremely useful pieces of advice for handling patients for all mental healthcare professionals. The Author titled it simply: “20 Commandments for Mental Health Workers

http://20commandments.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/20-commandments-for-mental-health.html

This fantastic article by Adam Roxley, himself a mental health nurse, challenges the stigma of mental health issues, both for sufferers and their carers, in this excellently written article – “Why are we so Scared of Mental Health”

http://www.nursingtimes.net/student-nursing-times/why-are-we-so-scared-of-mental-health/5039966.blog

This final regular blog is again by someone with the unique twin perspectives of RMN and mental health patient. This 32 year old registered mental nurse has recently been given a diagnosis of acute bipolar disorder and writes on her journey of understanding from her new perspective as patient rather than practitioner.

http://atrulyregisteredmentalnurse.blogspot.co.uk/

If you would like to share your own experiences of mental health nursing in the comments below, we’d love to hear from you.

Alternatively, if you have any articles, blogs or writers on mental health nursing which you would like to add to this list, just add the details in the comments below.

Mental Health Nursing Jobs in the UK

When you’re looking for a mental health nursing job the My Nursing Career site seems to have a good reputation for getting you the right position. With links to some major recruiters it’s like a one stop shop or money supermarket of nursing jobs and it seems simple to sign up.

If you have left any of the nursing professions or want a change then they want to help you get a better deal, less stress, more resources for patients, and on a timetable that suits you.

Here is a just a few of the positions they deal with

  • Mental Health Nursing Jobs
  • Auxiliary Nurse Jobs
  • RMN Jobs
  • RGN Jobs
  • Staff Nurse
  • Paediatric Nurse
  • Psychiatric Nurse
  • Neonatal Nurse

They also cover various positions like

  • Part-time Nurse Jobs
  • Full-time Nurse Jobs
  • Temporary Nursing Jobs
  • Contract Nursing Jobs